“Fire in the Sea” targets ages 12-15: the “Right Age” for Mythology.

If you have not already, please visit my award-winning Flash Fiction here, here and here. While you are there, take a moment to browse around the community at WOW; enter a contest, take a course and read their informative blog. Without hyperbole, they are as supportive and encouraging a group as any that a new writer will ever find.

minotaur

A Minotaur is fresh to some readers, but still recognizable.

When I first wrote Olivia of Olympus, I thought I was being original. After years of experiencing Dystopian YA fiction through the eyes of my students, I had begun to question why those familiar tropes should not instead be applied to existing legends. After all, it was the Norse and the Romans who first told tales of young heroes being pitted against impossible trials. It was the Greeks who proposed a society where women were freed, but at the cost of their lovers being killed and their sons enslaved. And when Zeus defied his wife, Hera, to express his overwhelming love for the human girl, Alcmene… well, a story like that has to give even Bella Swan a run for her mournful money.

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Flash Fiction Award

20-FE1-Winter08Contest-3rdplacegraphic2.jpgThe editors of WOW, and their guest-judge, have honored me with another award for a Flash Fiction entry. Read the Malicious Mist of Misery Sound here, and be sure to check out my previous first-place entries, here and here. In the meantime, keep scrolling down to join discussions about YA fiction.

The “Right Age” for Mythology?

 

For this entry in my series, The Right Age for Young Readers, I hope to start a discussion about whether existing mythology provides as valid an adventure in YA fiction as newly invented worlds. An excerpt from my edited 3-day novel project, Olivia of Olympus, is the starting point.

Olivia of Olympus, by K. Alan
from Chapter ε—A Long List of ex-Fathers

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By the middle of this fifth chapter, Livi has gotten over her anger at her nerdy classmate, Kent, for ruining her chance to dance for scouts at a talent show. The show is cancelled when Kent cannot bring back his nerdier friend, Steve, after making him disappear. Trying to untangle the failed magic act, Livi and Kent, along with their friend Elsie, discover a portal to the ancient Greek land of Themiscyra. After learning of the Amazons’ abuses against Kent for simply being male, Livi is angry, and no longer just looking for Steve. Olivia is now looking for justice.

 

“You’ve got a lot to answer for, lady,” I sizzled upward to the Amazon Queen.

Hippolyta seemed remarkably unconcerned. “The slave’s time was short,” she reasoned. “His passing was inevitable. Killing him was a mercy.”

A sunrise behind us was revealing more detail to the surroundings where the sentries had taken us. We were in the arena of some kind of coliseum, with circles of concentric benches all around us. Kent was seated on the lowest of these, while Elsie tended to the most obvious of his wounds. It was up to me, then, to face the woman who I had thought, up until now, might want to help us.

“Even if that’s true,” I countered about Ozzie’s death, “That doesn’t explain your treatment of the other slaves.”

Hippolyta shared a look with each of her attendants, taking a little too long to examine their flowing hair and the flowers decorating it. As if they were all sharing a joke, she shrugged down at me from her throne, explaining simply, “They are men.”

“They’re your sons.”

My comment passed darkly over her features, and I knew I had pressed a button.

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3 Electric Ways TV can Defibrillate your Writer’s Block

I need a break from my current series, The Right Age for Young Readers. Since I am having some writer’s block of my own, I thought I would fill the gap by reblogging this post, which was originally on Cow Pasture Chronicles. Hopefully, it will help someone else to deal with theirs!

When I was a kid, I was obsessed with television. I dreamed of the day that I could watch my choice of any TV show, at any time I wished. Now, that day has arrived, …

Source: 3 Electric Ways TV can Defibrillate your Writer’s Block