Driven

A Humorous Thriller by K. Alan Leitch

When a global conspiracy strikes, you can count on the DMV.

 

 Read a sample chapter from Driven right here!

Written by

K. Alan Leitch

Fiction

Novel

A Second Draft

80027 words



Genre

Action / Adventure

Thriller / Suspense

Humor





Target Audience

18+ Adult

This work could appeal to teenagers, but is aimed at adults in their twenties or thirties. It is written in a similar genre to various popular films.


Hook

David Bosley, a driving instructor for fifteen years, dismissed a young lawyer’s pleas for him to provide an alibi to free Charles Delano. Alfresca Sorrenti makes a compelling case, but Delano is a inmate whose name Deebo has never heard. His lifelong hatred of lawyers helps him to walk away from Alfie, until assailants try to run him off the road. Now Deebo, helped only by his incompetent collection of students, must drive his way into the heart of a global conspiracy way above his pay grade.

Synopsis

“Looking at the kid sitting there, all polite and almost chronically quiet, a person would never guess that she was among the most lethal of my students once armed with a fuelled vehicle. Driving with her could make a lemur turn to religion.”

– David Bosley, a.k.a. ‘Deebo,’ a DMV instructor who is drawn into a terrifying global conspiracy
When David Bosley’s most hated of all species–a lawyer–visits him in his workplace, it doesn’t matter to him how young, attractive or cool-headed she might be. All Bosley (who cannot convince his friends to stop calling him ‘Deebo’) wants is an excuse to throw her out of the Provo, Utah Department of Motor Vehicles, where he has dragged himself through fifteen years as a driving instructor. And she gives him the perfect opportunity.

Alfie tells him that her client, Charles Delano, has named Deebo as an alibi against the violent crimes he is accused of committing. Deebo’s testimony carries with it the promise of freedom for Delano, whom Alfie swears is an innocent man. The only problem is that Deebo has never heard of him. The case is closed, it would seem, on Ms Sorrenti.

Closed, that is, until Deebo takes a group of his chronically failing students out on the road for another lesson, when something happens that is even more frightening than Porkbelly’s driving habits from the streets of Cambodia–more frightening, even, than braving the dangers of Danny’s OCD on the road. For the first time in his chronically ordinary life, someone has taken notice of Deebo. And they are trying to run him off of the road.

Furious and terrified, Deebo at first confronts Alfie, then turns to her for help…but forces more influential than either prevent them from seeing Charles Delano before he is placed in solitary confinement. Delano only manages to send them a nine-digit number, a number that escalates the dangers around Deebo the following day; he is drugged in his favourite buffet, shot at in his workplace, and nearly driven into a ravine by the man who may be his reluctant best friend: conspiracy blogger Dig 4 Truth.

Realizing that he is alone, Deebo gathers to him the only people he can trust: his repeating students, including Porkbelly, Danny, Digley and Mrs Donner, an elderly widow who would do almost anything for him. Only time reveals that the least likely of them is a traitor.

While Deebo reflects upon a past that gradually reveals the reason for his hatred of lawyers, he reluctantly works alongside one to stage the most absurd jailbreak in American history. Deebo and Alfie gather a team of student drivers and misfit losers to bring Delano back out into the world that he claims he is trying to save. Together, their incompetence on the road unravels the mystery of Charles Delano, discovering his true identity, his connection to the Secret Service, and a plot against the leaders set to attend the forthcoming G8 World Summit in Provo.

Fans of thrillers and humor alike will find something to intrigue them in the story of ‘Driven,’ just as in other novels from the Provo Trilogy. Bosley lives a life that we can all recognize from our own, and, from the frustrations of that life, he pulls out the threads of determination he needs to become a hero.

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